Sunday, October 15, 2017

Cardinal Okogie’s Scolding of Pentecostal Churches


The unbraiding of Pentecostal Churches by the Archbishop Emeritus of the Catholic Archdiocese of Lagos, Cardinal Anthony Okogie, during an interview last week, was thought-provoking. Top of his conclusion was that there was no godliness in the decision by some churches in the country to have as many branches as possible. Apparently referring to multiplicity of branches of Pentecostal churches, the patriarch of the Lagos Catholics described such branches as “mere business centres”.

He declared: “The mushrooming of churches has not elicited commensurate level of godliness across the land. In order to bring us together and to get sanity back into this country, the fear of God must be number one. For example, I heard that one of my colleagues, Pastor Enoch Adeboye, said that he would love to build churches everywhere so as to make it easy for worshipers to walk to them. But for me, that is a useless statement. How can you say you will build churches everywhere? What kind of churches are you talking about? Those who are pastors are traders and a good number of them are businessmen. Such churches in most cases are more like business houses.”

Okogie simply hit the nail on the head. Pentecostal churches hardly aim to build affordable health centres or schools on every street in Nigeria. They hardly aim to build or equip public hospitals/schools or provide water for all on every street.  The majority of their members can’t afford the few schools built. They just aim to have branches on every street and make money to sustain the posh lifestyle of their founders. This is neo-slavery. Most of the churches are set up to milk their gullible followers with wild imaginary miracles. Charismatic and smooth-talking Pentecostal preachers are worshipped by mesmerised followers who cringe under them. These power-dressing pastors simply want money from their followers to sustain their posh lifestyle.

Just look around you and you will see Pentecostal pastors flying around in private jets and driving around in limousines, while the majority of their followers wallow in abject poverty. They drive the best cars and live in the best houses. These entranced members contribute money to buy posh aircraft and cars for them. I can’t forget the presentation of 2014 Rolls Royce Phantom to the General Overseer of Christ Royal Family International Church, Lagos, Bishop Tom Samson, in March 2016 during his 50th birthday celebration. Samson had set tongues wagging back in 2014 when he got a N80 million stretch hummer limousine from an undisclosed church member. So many Nigerians have fallen for Pentecostal scam. Come to think of it, if they are really doing the will of God, this country would not be in this mess.

Something is clearly wrong somewhere. Despite the multiplicity of churches, there is still so much corruption, hunger, disease, poverty, unemployment, wickedness, witchcraft and frightening man’s inhumanity to man in this country. Notwithstanding the array of churches and mosques, this country is dominated by morally-bankrupt people. Nigerians spend too much of their time praying and running to churches and mosques, instead of working and being their brother’s keeper. This is why we have remained a third-world country.

Countries dominated by religious zealots hardly develop. In my dear Nigeria, churches buy premises of failed factories and convert them to churches. Can these churches create jobs and pay taxes? We can’t continue like this. We should be talking about building cottage industries, schools and health centres on every street, instead of churches and mosques. Things have just got to change.

This was copied from "MY FRIENDS" forum posted by Engr. John Okupa, 14.10.'17.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

It's a GIRL!

With confidence, my birth was announced, not so for many girls in Asia or Africa. In your corner of the world, the phrase, “Wetin your neighbour born?” (meaning, kini ara ile e bi? in Yoruba) and the implication may be lost on you, but not so for thousands of women who hang their heads and shy away from looking at the child after birthing their kind.

Many have had to welcome another bride for failure to “produce” a son, many kept “producing unlimited” until they had a son. For others, even where the man celebrates and is satisfied with the birth of girls, other women harass the woman to continue the “production”.

For some, this has led to divorce especially where the family resource is stretched as a result. Sadly, some are compelled to sign up for abortion and in a worst case scenario, abortion is suggested and induced without the knowledge of the woman once scan reveals feminine features. When many hear female infanticide, fingers point to India but read your history books and you’d see that it spans across ages and continents. For most, it was a way of controlling population, for others, it was a special sacrifice to a mute god!

The days of flogging girls for playing boys’ game (football), dreaming to be engineers or daring to campaign for political posts may have eroded but don’t you still hear statements like, “Girls are not good in mathematics!” “Boy’s don’t cry!” “How come a girl came first in your class?” “All your education will end in the kitchen!” Perhaps, you have also seen an all-female choir with boys as lead singers or drummers! Girls are still being subjected to gender-based abuse – sexual exploitation, child-marriage, genital mutilation, forced organ harvesting. That tells you we are still far from done in the task of emancipating the girl child!

Today, I join others to commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child which was instituted in 2012 by the United Nations, as I shout out loud the theme for 2017: "Empower Girls: Before, during and after crisis" and draw inspiration from the 2015 theme: “The Power of the Adolescent Girl: Vision for 2030”.



According to the UN Women's statement, "Across the world, empowered girls are raising their voices to fight for their rights and protection in all contexts. They are working to end violence against women and girls, to recognise indigenous rights, and to build peaceful and cohesive communities." Unfortunately, not all girls have ben nurtured to know their rights let alone equipped with skills to ask for these rights. 

Many countries in Africa used 2015's theme, not 2017's theme, this tells a story of the fact that girls world over are not on the same page and we cannot force them to be. Pushing the girls in Africa to the borderless freedom experienced by girls in the West, may be rebuffed for many reasons including the negative effects. Yet we can all agree on one thing. Girls can be empowered and respected.

Before we can empower girls or move positively and progressively towards 2030, the girl child must survive today. The genuine smile and laughter of the girl child must be kept alive and far away from brutality, abuse, rape, prostitution, trafficking, early marriage, genital mutilation and all forms of discrimination against her person. The rights of the girl child, like the rights of the boy child, are human rights and must be protected. The girl gild must then be equipped with skills to know her rights and ask for them within the context of the culture she is located. Older women especially must be drawn into this as allies so the voices of girls would not be muffled.

Over and beyond all the hypes, I implore women (and men) to accept the birth of girls as a priceless gift from God. I encourage you to train girls, not as boys but as girls; open them up to opportunities beyond the restrictive walls of the classroom; encourage them to innovate and boldly light up a torch to help them see that they are capable of holding up their own. Let their confidence receive a boost by the fact that, even in the myopic branding of our space as “man’s world”, their positioning as nurturers keeps men living, learning and labouring.

If your girl is a baby, find time to nurture her; let her know that humans care, not cage. If your girl is a child, find time to talk to her; let her learn from you that humans talk, not bark. If your girl is a teen, find time to take her out and share experience, let her learn that she is to be loved, not abused. If your girl is a woman, find time to encourage and appreciate her, let her know that she is valued far above rubies!!!

If any girl in your area of influence has been caged, terrorised, abused, devalued, violated… Please give her hope by caring, speaking, sharing and loving. When you treat girls right, the boys will take a cue from you. Building a better world starts with you and me.
A house-help was beaten and battered. When I saw her, the physical pain was long gone but the scars were visible just like the emotional scare and scars the brutality inflicted on this human that is someday expected to nurture others. How could she ever give what she never got?

After two visits to a girls’ remand home in Lagos, some of the inmates wormed up to me. No, they were not supposed to share but obviously they needed hearing ears. I listened and fought back the tears as one narrated how her mother fed her faeces! It was her race away from home in search of survival that landed her in the home with other girls – few criminals, many criminalised. Another narrated how an unrelated uncle turned her into a sex object, rather than her aunty standing up for her, they teamed up to send her packing. The stories are endless. But should another girl come by you without the story changing?

On the far extreme are those who pamper and spoil their girls, nurturing them with furs, purrs and the notion that they need not lift a finger as someday the right man with the right manuscript will come and sing them to wealth. The brain and beauty bestowed on them are channelled towards one goal and one goal alone, a life of wealth. This is equally to the detriment of such girls because they never are strong enough to look deep within for the greatness divinely locked in them.

You can help change ONE girl’s story. You owe a moral duty to let such wickedness stop with you, even if you missed out on that care. Forgive your past to heal your future. Look around you, there are girls crying out for care. If all hands are on deck, the goals for girls can be sustained and advanced. Formally or informally, invest in girls and promote zero tolerance for abuse. Educate one! Educate more!!! In school, I learnt to interact and understand people of other cultures and faiths. #62milliongirls don’t have that chance. You can #HelpGirlsLearn. You can #EmPOWERGirls.

Together, we can ensure the girl child is positioned to tap into a lifetime that offers real life opportunities and is focused on the vision of empowerment.

Someday, the ills directed at the girl child will be over, because of YOU. UBUNTU!


By Dr. Omolola Omoteso, Editor Willows Magazine and Project Director of Cares Globa Network. 
She can be reached  via willowsmagazine@gmail.com.


It's a GIRL!

With confidence, my birth was announced, not so for many girls in Asia or Africa. In your corner of the world, the phrase, “Wetin your neighbour born?” (meaning, kini ara ile e bi? in Yoruba) and the implication may be lost on you, but not so for thousands of women who hang their heads and shy away from looking at the child after birthing their kind.

Many have had to welcome another bride for failure to “produce” a son, many kept “producing unlimited” until they had a son. For others, even where the man celebrates and is satisfied with the birth of girls, other women harass the woman to continue the “production”.

For some, this has led to divorce especially where the family resource is stretched as a result. Sadly, some are compelled to sign up for abortion and in a worst case scenario, abortion is suggested and induced without the knowledge of the woman once scan reveals feminine features. When many hear female infanticide, fingers point to India but read your history books and you’d see that it spans across ages and continents. For most, it was a way of controlling population, for others, it was a special sacrifice to a mute god!

The days of flogging girls for playing boys’ game (football), dreaming to be engineers or daring to campaign for political posts may have eroded but don’t you still hear statements like, “Girls are not good in mathematics!” “Boy’s don’t cry!” “How come a girl came first in your class?” “All your education will end in the kitchen!” Perhaps, you have also seen an all-female choir with boys as lead singers or drummers! Girls are still being subjected to gender-based abuse – sexual exploitation, child-marriage, genital mutilation, forced organ harvesting. That tells you we are still far from done in the task of emancipating the girl child!

Today, I join others to commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child which was instituted in 2012 by the United Nations, as I shout out loud the theme for 2017: "Empower Girls: Before, during and after crisis" and draw inspiration from the 2015 theme: “The Power of the Adolescent Girl: Vision for 2030”.



According to the UN Women's statement, "Across the world, empowered girls are raising their voices to fight for their rights and protection in all contexts. They are working to end violence against women and girls, to recognise indigenous rights, and to build peaceful and cohesive communities." Unfortunately, not all girls have ben nurtured to know their rights let alone equipped with skills to ask for these rights. 

Many countries in Africa used 2015's theme, not 2017's theme, this tells a story of the fact that girls world over are not on the same page and we cannot force them to be. Pushing the girls in Africa to the borderless freedom experienced by girls in the West, may be rebuffed for many reasons including the negative effects. Yet we can all agree on one thing. Girls can be empowered and respected.

Before we can empower girls or move positively and progressively towards 2030, the girl child must survive today. The genuine smile and laughter of the girl child must be kept alive and far away from brutality, abuse, rape, prostitution, trafficking, early marriage, genital mutilation and all forms of discrimination against her person. The rights of the girl child, like the rights of the boy child, are human rights and must be protected. The girl gild must then be equipped with skills to know her rights and ask for them within the context of the culture she is located. Older women especially must be drawn into this as allies so the voices of girls would not be muffled.

Over and beyond all the hypes, I implore women (and men) to accept the birth of girls as a priceless gift from God. I encourage you to train girls, not as boys but as girls; open them up to opportunities beyond the restrictive walls of the classroom; encourage them to innovate and boldly light up a torch to help them see that they are capable of holding up their own. Let their confidence receive a boost by the fact that, even in the myopic branding of our space as “man’s world”, their positioning as nurturers keeps men living, learning and labouring.

If your girl is a baby, find time to nurture her; let her know that humans care, not cage. If your girl is a child, find time to talk to her; let her learn from you that humans talk, not bark. If your girl is a teen, find time to take her out and share experience, let her learn that she is to be loved, not abused. If your girl is a woman, find time to encourage and appreciate her, let her know that she is valued far above rubies!!!

If any girl in your area of influence has been caged, terrorised, abused, devalued, violated… Please give her hope by caring, speaking, sharing and loving. When you treat girls right, the boys will take a cue from you. Building a better world starts with you and me.
A house-help was beaten and battered. When I saw her, the physical pain was long gone but the scars were visible just like the emotional scare and scars the brutality inflicted on this human that is someday expected to nurture others. How could she ever give what she never got?

After two visits to a girls’ remand home in Lagos, some of the inmates wormed up to me. No, they were not supposed to share but obviously they needed hearing ears. I listened and fought back the tears as one narrated how her mother fed her faeces! It was her race away from home in search of survival that landed her in the home with other girls – few criminals, many criminalised. Another narrated how an unrelated uncle turned her into a sex object, rather than her aunty standing up for her, they teamed up to send her packing. The stories are endless. But should another girl come by you without the story changing?

On the far extreme are those who pamper and spoil their girls, nurturing them with furs, purrs and the notion that they need not lift a finger as someday the right man with the right manuscript will come and sing them to wealth. The brain and beauty bestowed on them are channelled towards one goal and one goal alone, a life of wealth. This is equally to the detriment of such girls because they never are strong enough to look deep within for the greatness divinely locked in them.

You can help change ONE girl’s story. You owe a moral duty to let such wickedness stop with you, even if you missed out on that care. Forgive your past to heal your future. Look around you, there are girls crying out for care. If all hands are on deck, the goals for girls can be sustained and advanced. Formally or informally, invest in girls and promote zero tolerance for abuse. Educate one! Educate more!!! In school, I learnt to interact and understand people of other cultures and faiths. #62milliongirls don’t have that chance. You can #HelpGirlsLearn. You can #EmPOWERGirls.

Together, we can ensure the girl child is positioned to tap into a lifetime that offers real life opportunities and is focused on the vision of empowerment.

Someday, the ills directed at the girl child will be over, because of YOU. UBUNTU!


By Dr. Omolola Omoteso, Editor Willows Magazine and Project Director of Cares Globa Network. 
She can be reached  via willowsmagazine@gmail.com.

Monday, October 9, 2017

Former pepper hawker earns PhD in Biomedical Engineering

A young Nigerian lady, Adeola Olubamiji, whose story is that of the proverbial grass-to-grace has not only done herself proud by earning a PhD in Biomedical Engineering, her story is an encouragement that where there is a will, there is a way.

Read her moving tribute on her graduation day:

“As the fifth child of five, I always had to wait for my turn. I was the last, a girl child and raised by a mother who is a farmer and a father who has little.

“I hawked pepper on the streets of Ibadan as early as age 10 to help my mum. Went to public primary and secondary schools in Ibadan. Attended OOU and studied Physics.

“Because I had a 2.1, it opened the door for me to proceed to Finland for a Master’s Degree in Biomedical Engineering. During this Master’s degree, I worked part-time as a cleaner and did this after my Master’s as well.

“Out of determination, I applied to over 100 schools for my PhD and finally got a full three-year scholarship (later extended to four years) at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, to pursue a PhD in Biomedical Engineering.

“While in that PhD programme, I worked part-time as a makeup artist, teaching assistant, braided hair and fixed weaves to make extra money.

“Today, I walked the stage as the first black person to bag a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada!

“I walked this stage for you Mama Africa and for my Motherland Nigeria! I walked the stage for all of you Black women disrespected and looked down on!

“I walked for all of you from my ghetto hood, Mokola, Ibadan. I walked for all OSU students and ex-students that got that look from people who think we are not brilliant!

“I walked for all of you Africans in Finland wondering what is next for you!!

“Specially, I walked for you my parents, siblings and extended family in fulfilment of your dreams!

“Specially, I walked the stage for you my late sister Omoleye Olubamiji; and my late mentor Ayodele Olatunbosun.

“Today, I walked for my future husband and my unborn children who patiently waited for me to fulfil my dreams so that he can have a wife he will be proud of and they can have a role model to look up to.

“I walked for all immigrants and all young adults who strived everyday chasing their dreams!

“I walked in celebration of the unfailing love of my first and one truly true love, Jesus Christ, (in you I walk, in you I live, and in you I have had and will continue to have my being)!

“Be bold, be innovative, be different, be you, be everything you want to be; but remember to put God first!

“Let no man, upbringing, money, circumstance, colourism, past mistakes, institution, company, partner, background, let nothing tell you ‘you can’t do it.’

“Go smart! Go hard!! Go for Gold!!! Go with God!!! Just Get Going!!!!! #Grad2017 #PhDConvocation #UofS”

Editor’s Note: This post has been edited.  Adeola Olubamiji is the first black to obtain a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada.

Source: Punchng

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

VP Osinbajo in media chat after town-hall meeting in Ilaje LGA, Ondo State

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 

PRESS RELEASE

WE ARE MAKING PROGRESS IN NIGER DELTA - OSINBAJO


Q: What is the purpose of your visit to this place? 

A: As you know, this is the last of the oil producing communities that I have been visiting in the last few months. Igbokoda in Ilaje Local Government, the oil producing community in this state have also, naturally, demanded a visit, so we are completing the round of visits to the oil producing communities with this particular visit, so it is one of the consultations with the oil producing communities.

Q: Sir, how soon will all these things demanded by the people be implemented?

A: Every one of them is being implemented and they are being implemented incrementally.  For example we said we were going to open the Maritime University and we are opening in October. 
We have said we are going to do modular refineries; we have released the guidelines and licenses are being issued. We are engaging with the communities, we are engaging with the state governments. We have talked about getting power to Ilaje Local Government, the contract has been awarded, N600 million has been paid. This is a project that has been abandoned for over 10 years but we are doing it and ensuring that power comes to this Local Government Area and to this community. So, everything is being done, it is incremental but we are taking them step by step. The Ogoni clean up as you know, has already started. 

Laolu Akande
Senior Special Assistant on Media & Publicity to the President
Office of the Vice President
12 September 2017

Thursday, August 31, 2017

We are prepared to partner with UK investors - Vice President Osinbajo

OFFICE OF THE ACTING PRESIDENT


PRESS RELEASE



WE ARE PREPARED TO PARTNER WITH UK INVESTORS - OSINBAJO    

*There is a great deal of enthusiasm on our part to help private sector succeed, Vice President tells visiting UK Ministers.

*Nigeria has an amazing future – UK’s Boris Johnson

As the Buhari administration continues its drives to promote private sector partnership, it remains ready to provide the necessary assistance to private investors looking to invest in the country, according to Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, SAN.

Prof. Osinbajo stated this when a delegation of UK Ministers led by British Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson paid him a courtesy visit at the Presidential Villa today. Also at the meeting were Foreign Affairs Minister, Mr Geoffrey Onyeama and Budget and National Planning Minister, Senator Udoma Udo Udoma.

The Vice President said the relationship between Nigeria and United Kingdom is very important, assuring that “the next few years are certainly going to be more interesting”.

He mentioned that Nigeria has huge potential and according to him, “investors would salivate if those potentials were realised” and the country is “close to the tipping point in terms of making that happen”.

He added that in terms of trade, Nigeria had no choice but to diversify from oil and now more attention is focused on agriculture, agro-processing and more interest in technology.

According to the Vice President, “UK are our natural partners and it is much easier for business because of the relationship over time and because of the robust presence of the UK here in Nigeria through the DFID which has been tremendously supportive’’.

In the area of housing, Prof. Osinbajo stated that Nigeria would be looking to partner with the United Kingdom, adding that government is interested in construction companies with the expertise and technical know-how to deliver mass housing projects across the country.

He also emphasised the role of the private sector as well as the role of government in creating an enabling environment for businesses to thrive in the country.

He assured investors that the Federal Government is prepared to partner with them, provide assistance where necessary and solve the problems as they emerge.

In his own remarks, the UK’s Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Mr. Boris Johnson, who observed that “Nigeria has an amazing future”, stated that the United Kingdom is partnering with Nigeria in different areas including intelligence sharing in the fight against terrorism.

Johnson added that the UK is also working to build an economic partnership with Nigeria given the country’s status as the powerhouse of Africa and the biggest economy in the continent.

Priti Patel, Secretary of State for International Development, Paul Arkwright, British High Commissioner to Nigeria and other top officials were on the visit to the Presidential Villa.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

WE ARE JUDGED BY WHAT WE START THAT IS SUSTAINABLE YEARS AFTER, SAYS OSINBAJO

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT

PRESS RELEASE

REMARKS BY THE VICE PRESIDENT, FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA, HIS EXCELLENCY, PROFYEMI OSINBAJO, SAN, GCON, AT THE COMMISSIONING OF BUA CEMENT FACTORY IN OKPELLA, EDO STATE, ON AUGUST 29, 2017.

PROTOCOL

It is my singular honour and pleasure today to visit, inspect and commission this 3 million tonne capacity, ultra-modern cement plant, right here in Okpella, Edo State.

I am extremely proud to be a Nigerian and I’m sure that several of us here are. This is a wholly Nigerian enterprise and we know that the planning, the execution and successful establishment of this industrial complex was done by a Nigerian and by a Nigerian team. It is really good to know.

The construction of this plant, is of course a big boost, to the Nigerian economy, it means thousands of direct jobs and indirect jobs, both for skilled and un-skilled workers, from the commencement of the works to thecurrent smooth-running of the production process.

As a matter of fact, we are told that production is on now and there is no dust, no noise, it is all just working so very well. This, I think, is just an amazing thing indeed.

At the level of production already attained, it also means a consolidation of Nigeria’s self-sufficiency in cement and a big boost to our export capacity.

As noted by the chairman himself, Alhaji Abdulsamad Rabiu BUA, during a visit to my office on July 7, 2017, he spoke about two factors which he thought would bring down the cost and availability of cement in Nigeria.

One of those was the currency exchange rate and, of course, it was completely correct to say that as our currency improves and stabilises and we see a reduction in the price of low pour fuel oil, it is inevitable that production cost and market price of cement will come down to a level that is within the reach of many more Nigerians.

I am also happy to note that in the construction of the power production facility for this plant, the BUA Group has used the most modern and efficient gas turbines which combines low and economical running cost with a very high degree of reliability. This enterprise typifies our expectations as a government.

In the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan which was launched by Mr. President on the 5th of April, 2017, he made it clear that Nigeria’s economic emancipation and growth must be private sector led and driven. There is simply no public sector resource that can match the resources and commitment of the private sector.

For us as a government, doing all we can to encourage investment of this type is not just a good idea, it is thecornerstone of our economic policy. There is no other way to grow this country without the active management and participation of the private sector – it must be private sector led.

As a government, we are committed to creating an enabling environment and eliminating the bottlenecks that impede innovation and market-based solutions.

Another underlining discipline of the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP), and which is worthy ofmention here, is our focus on combating the identified constraints to growth: factors like fuel shortages, inadequacy of power, access to foreign exchange, unfriendly business regulations, shortage of skilled manpower etc.

All of these are constraints we are determined to deal with, and I want to seize this opportunity to reassert the determination of the Buhari administration to continue with what I will describe as enabling business environment, while going the extra mile to directly assist the private sector in steadily growing our economy.

In this regard, we are working very hard with the Industrial Policy Council, of which the chairman of the BUA Group is a prominent member, to evolve and implement well considered solutions to business impediments and economic stagnation in Nigeria.

Again, I must commend the Edo State Government under His Excellency, Governor Godwin Obaseki, and the former Governor of Edo State, Adams Oshiomole. Your business friendly policies and your preparedness to back private sector initiatives is an excellent demonstration of how to grow the economy and create worthwhile jobs in the process.    

Your Excellency, Governor Obaseki, I must commend you for diligently building on the commendable work ofGovernor Oshiomole. This is how great societies are built.

Nation building is never judged by the number of new projects or fresh ideas that we begin, we are judged by what we complete and sustain well years after. So it is not how well we start, it’s more how well we finish and maintain what we have created for the benefits of our people in the years to come.

Last but not the least, I want to congratulate my brother and friend, Alhaji Abdulsamad Rabiu, as well as the management and staff of the BUA Group for this remarkable achievement. Abdulsamad, you are numbered amongst individuals in Nigeria who are properly described as entrepreneurs; men and women running value-adding, job-creating enterprises using local resources and talents to create value and wealth.

The world’s greatest economies attain significance by the contributions of major entrepreneurs such as yourself. It is not by those who describe themselves as businessmen, but are in fact just rent seekers.

This country will only grow on the talent and resourcefulness of people like yourself who are ready to put their resources out and invest anywhere in the country, employ the local people in that community and add real value to the lives of Nigerians.

It is my sincere hope and prayer that you will continue steadily on the path of growth knowing that on your success hangs the hopes of millions.

So it is now my very special pleasure and privilege to commission this plant (we are still going to go and take a look at it and do so formally) for the benefit of Edo State, the Nigerian people, and others all over the world who will benefit from its products, and to the glory of God.

Thank you very much.